Monday, September 11, 2017

The Modern Sunset


I generally have a love-hate relationship with sunset photography. I love experiencing them in real life, but I really don't like sunset photos. As a child I always remember seeing people marvel over a shot that had neon pink colourings with over saturated reds and yellows. Apparently this was a sure sign of a superior shot. As a designer I typically despise these scenes, I find the color palette tacky and unsophisticated. So while travelling in Hawaii I made a plan to rediscover sunset photography. I wanted something with warmth and atmosphere, but not a garish spectrum of 1980's colour. By using the final rays of light, subtle atmospheric tones and some careful adjustment in Lightroom - I think I found my happy place.
Hawaii_sunset_photography_lightroom
Lightroom_presets_hawaii_travel_sunsetphotograpy


sunset_travel_bookcover_design



Saturday, September 2, 2017

Creating movement with slow shutter speeds


shutter speed movement camerablur slow shutter speed on camerashutter speed info graphic

As humans we are designed to always be moving, whether it's a twitch or a flat out sprint our bodies never stop. Recently I've been re-discovering the art of capturing movement with my camera. To be honest it's not really that easy - but, when you get it right there are some subtle and seductive qualities that are hard to beat. Shooting with movement definitely adds interest and can help describe the scene far more than a razor sharp image ever could. There's a few tips that seem to work for me:
  1. Typically anything under 1/30th sec will start to add movement
  2. Anything under 1/30th sec will typically require a tripod.
  3. Look for scenes that have isolated movement, images always look better when there is a combination of blurred movement and sharp elements
  4. Try moving the camera and subject slowly in sync for a sharp subject and slightly streaked background
  5. Try moving the camera and subject rapidly in sync for a sharp subject and very streaked background

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Camera Basics Infographic

 Camera Basics
Aperture The aperture is an adjustable hole in the lens which lets light into the camera. It can be adjusted to vary the amount of light on the camera sensor. A large aperture lets more light in, and small aperture reduces the amount of light.
Depth of Field The aperture also controls the depth of field, in simple terms this refers to how much of the image stays sharp from the focus point. A large aperture will create a shallow depth of field (making the background blurry). A small aperture will create a large depth of field (keeping everything in focus).
Shutter speed  Shutter speed is the length of time the shutter is open allowing light on the camera sensor. This is sometimes called exposure time. A faster shutter speed will freeze action (1/250sec), a slow shutter will allow action to blur (1/15sec).
ISO Film Speed ISO is the level of sensitivity of your camera has to available light. Shooting with a low ISO will give you a high quality image with fine grain, to do this you’ll also need lots of light. Using a higher ISO means can take photos in low-light conditions, the trade-off is it will have more grain or “noise”.
Lens Selection A wide-angle lens will take in more of the environment, this is ideal for landscapes, travel or interior shots. A longer telephoto lens magnifies the scene giving you a narrower viewing angle. Longer lenses also tend to make the depth-of-field more pronounced, this means the background elements will often be more blurry.

Camera Basics Summary

Aperture
The aperture is an adjustable hole in the lens which lets light into the camera. It can be adjusted to vary the amount of light on the camera sensor. A large aperture lets more light in, and small aperture reduces the amount of light.

Depth of Field
The aperture also controls the depth of field, in simple terms this refers to how much of the image stays sharp from the focus point. A large aperture will create a shallow depth of field (making the background blurry). A small aperture will create a large depth of field (keeping everything in focus).

Shutter Speed 
Shutter speed is the length of time the shutter is open allowing light on the camera sensor. This is sometimes called exposure time. A faster shutter speed will freeze action (1/250sec), a slow shutter will allow action to blur (1/15sec).

ISO Film Speed
ISO is the level of sensitivity of your camera has to available light. Shooting with a low ISO will give you a high quality image with fine grain, to do this you’ll also need lots of light. Using a higher ISO means can take photos in low-light conditions, the trade-off is it will have more grain or “noise”.

Lens Selection
A wide-angle lens will take in more of the environment, this is ideal for landscapes, travel or interior shots. A longer telephoto lens magnifies the scene giving you a narrower viewing angle. Longer lenses also tend to make the depth-of-field more pronounced, this means the background elements will often be more blurry.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Lightroom Tutorial Basic Editing




Basic steps to editing this image in Lightroom.
  1. Define the square crop
  2. Increase vibrancy and saturation subtly
  3. Add cool blue tones to both shadows and highlights
    using the split tone palette
  4. Add light with a central radial gradient filter, also
    add a small amount of clarity to this filter.
  5. Darken the sky with a vertical gradient filter
  6. Add blue tones to the vertical gradient filter to help match the sky with the rest of the image.